Denise Weimer: Let’s Chat!

Welcome, everyone!

Denise WeimerDenise Weimer joins our circle today. This author writes historical and contemporary romance and romantic suspense set in her home state of Georgia. She’s authored over ten novels and a number of novellas. As a managing editor for the historical imprints of Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas, she also helps others reach their publishing dreams.

Denise is offering Fall Flip, The Witness Tree, Spring Splash, or Traces in ebook format to someone who joins our chat circle below. You can find her and her books on Amazon at https://amzn.to/38CAo3w.

Now, here’s our honored guest, Denise Weimer.

A Historical Author and Editor Writing Contemporary Romance and Romantic Suspense? Why, yes!

It stands to reason that a girl who grew up steeped in Gone With the Wind, Eugenia Price, and Civil War living history and vintage dance would write historical romance. And for many years, that’s what I did. I had a number of historical novellas and novels published before my agent told me that contemporary romance was often easier to place with publishers. So … I wrote several contemporary stories, all set in my home state of Georgia.

Denise Weimer
F
all Flip
was the first off the press in September 2019, gleaning reviews as warm and fuzzy as its Hallmarky/HGTV vibe. I’m hopeful its readers are eager for Spring Splash, releasing this month along with Traces. But some may wonder … why an athletic romance? And Traces, a romantic suspense techno-thriller? Boy, Denise has really gone off the deep end with these.

Allow me to explain.

Spring Splash

romantic suspense
S
pring Splash
combines two great loves of mine. For almost fifteen years, writing and being a swim mom ran on courses that appeared would never intersect. My two daughters, Emily and Abigail, started their athletic journeys at ages six and four, respectively. The sport played a huge part in molding them into the confident and compassionate individuals they are today.

Denise Weimer
W
hen my older daughter first participated in high school meets, a special competition hosted during intermission captured my attention. The coaches of a local organization named Extra Special People (ESP – extraspecialpeople.com) fielded two relay teams. ESP is a non-profit in the Athens, Georgia area that serves children and young adults with developmental disabilities and their families. The crowds went wild as those enthusiastic athletes stroked through the water, and the inspiration for Spring Splash was born—even though I didn’t realize it for about five more years. As I became aware my time in the stands was winding down, the idea came back to me.

And Traces?

romantic suspense
A
s a writer, I look for the unique and the little-known—but the truthful or realistic—to inspire settings and plots. The idea for Traces began with a reality TV show that ran only one season in the U.S. (2017), but it captured my attention because I recognized many of the filming locations here in Georgia. The U.S. version of Hunted was an offshoot of the original, ongoing British version. In both shows, contestants seek to evade skilled investigators for a set amount of time in a set area in order to win a cash prize.

The second piece of Traces was The Eye, technology that may seem futuristic but for all intents and purposes already exists. Constant Hawk was developed in the early 2000s at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The wide-area motion imagery (WAMI) system weighed around 1500 pounds and was flown on manned aircraft in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The technology from Constant Hawk has continued to evolve. Brazilian officials mounted four Simera cameras on weather balloons and small blimps to surveille the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. Thirteen full-motion cameras capable of zoom captured real-time footage with sixty times the resolution of high definition at three frames per second.

Denise Weimer
F
rom these examples of existing WAMI systems, it’s not hard to picture one being installed on a skyscraper. That type of surveillance makes some feel secure, but for others, it would represent a total loss of freedom. A perfect and unique setting for a suspense novel.

So will you genre hop with me? I hope you’ll find it worth the adventure. Bring along your happy-tears tissues for Spring Splash and your chamomile tea for after you read Traces.

Connect with Denise Weimer

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~ ~ ~

Lord, please bless each word Denise Weimer writes for You.
For Jesus’ sake

18 thoughts on “Denise Weimer: Let’s Chat!

  1. Suzanne Sellner

    I’m just becoming familiar with Denise Weimer and her books and look forward to reading them. I, too, have lived in Georgia and love reading about places where I’ve lived.

     
     
    1. Denise Weimer

      Nice to “meet,” Suzanne!!

       
       
  2. Jean

    I follow Denise on social media already. She is still a new author for me but her books are on my huge TPR list. 😉
    I love suspenseful stories!

     
     
    1. Denise Weimer

      Jean, I hope you get to read and enjoy them soon. ☺️

       
       
  3. Rose Blackard

    These books sound awesome. I love to read about actual places in books

     
     
    1. Denise Weimer

      Rose, that’s great! The Witness Tree is set in NW GA, Fall Flip in Augusta, Spring Splash in Athens, and Traces in Atlanta. ❤️

       
       
  4. The witness tree sounds intriguing. I lived in GA for 7 years and visit often. I’d probably recognize scenes. That would make the books more personal.

     
     
    1. Denise Weimer

      Teresa, I bet you would. It’s set in NW GA at the Chief Vann House.

       
       
  5. Joan Arning

    I already follow Denise on Facebook and Bookbub and get her newsletter!

     
     
    1. Denise Weimer

      I appreciate staying connected!

       
       
  6. Melinda Grace

    I love to read stories that take place in areas I know! Thanks for posting the link to this site and Denise’s site. I’ll take a closer look at both tomorrow!

     
     
    1. Denise Weimer

      Thanks for stopping by, Melinda.

       
       
  7. Lisa

    Can’t wait to check out these books.

     
     
    1. Denise Weimer

      Thanks, Lisa! Good luck.

       
       
  8. Tabitha Mccullers

    I would love to read all these books!!
    How did I not know you were an author.

     
     
    1. Denise Weimer

      Hey, Tabitha! Glad you found out. ☺️

       
       
  9. Wendy

    I absolutely loved Fall Flip! I’m reading The Witness Tree now. I plan to own all of Denise’s wonderful books. She’s a fantastic author but even more a fabulous friend! I wish you many successes, dear friend!
    Wendy

     
     
    1. Denise Weimer

      Thank you so much, Wendy! You’re a sweetie.

       
       

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Sandra Ardoin: Let’s Chat

Welcome, everyone!

Sandra ArdoinSandra Ardoin, author of heartwarming and award-winning historical romance novels, stops by for a chat this week. She delves into some questions authors ask themselves when writing stories.

Sandra engages readers with page-turning stories of love and faith. Rarely out of reach of a book, she’s also an armchair sports enthusiast, country music listener, and seldom says no to eating out.

You may visit her at www.sandraardoin.com. Or connect with her on BookBub, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, and Pinterest. You may join the Love and Faith in Fiction community and keep up with what’s new with Sandra, discover what’s upcoming, and learn of specials and giveaways.

Sandra Ardoin

It Begins with Captivating Questions by Sandra Ardoin

As a reader, what is a question you ask an author when meeting one in person or online? What are you most curious about with regard to their writing?

After I reveal my writing habit to someone, I’m generally asked what I write. Next is usually an inquiry into where I find my ideas. Both are valid questions and can prompt authors to talk in detail about writing. Boy, can we talk about writing! 😉

But writers ask questions too. Things we’ve heard, read, dreamed, or seen can become springboards for compelling books. But how?

My books are Christian historical romance, concentrating mainly on the time period between the American Civil War and the early 1900s. You might think that gives me a great deal of history to fall back on when it comes to placing the story. Yes and no. The story circumstances or setting will often limit me to a certain period in time—a certain decade or even year.

Sandra Ardoin_https://www.amazon.com/Love-Most-Worthy-Sandra-Ardoin-ebook/dp/B07MDXHH2M/ref=sr_1_2?crid=323SX63R9LPCM&keywords=sandra+ardoin&qid=1573491740&sprefix=Sandra+Ardo%2Caps%2C169&sr=8-2

For instance, with A Love Most Worthy, I had the opportunity to do a mail-order bride story and got it into my head to do a gold rush setting.

Where?

I asked myself that over and over, because I wanted it to be somewhere unique, somewhere other than the typical American West. I decided to set it in a real location rather than a fictional one as I’ve done in the past. After the initial research, I settled on Nome, Alaska.

Sandra Ardoin
M
any of the ideas for the story and local color came from tidbits I found during the research, but they also limited me to late 1899 or 1900. I didn’t want my hero and heroine, Rance and Hallie, trapped inside during an Alaskan winter, so my best choice in a time frame became the summer of 1900 when the rush was in full swing and the town more like a small city.

For my debut novella, The Yuletide Angel, I’d decided to give my heroine, Violet, a secret philanthropical venture.

Sandra Ardoin

What?

It takes place at a time of the year when giving is prevalent, so she secretly leaves packages of food at needy people’s doorways. But the secret giving?

Why?

Because she doesn’t want the credit. She doesn’t want people making a big deal of it. That leads to the hero, Hugh, setting out to protect her—secretly—as she makes her rounds.

Something else happened when I wrote that story. I created a brother for Hugh—Kit Barnes. He was charming and had a less-than-stellar past. From almost the first time he appeared on the page, I knew he needed his own story—his opportunity to make amends to the woman he’d once betrayed. Out came the questions: who, what, when, where, why, and how? The answers helped to form my novel A Reluctant Melody.

Sandra Ardoin

My current release, Unwrapping Hope, came about because I wanted to do another 19th-century Christmas novella. As I pondered ideas, I wrote down various things one associates with Christmas (besides Jesus)—snow, ornaments, carols, etc. One situation kept coming to mind: a gift received in error. Phoebe Crain gets a gift not meant for her.

Why? Ah, another question that sent the wheels spinning. The answer involved my hero.

Who?

Once I decided the setting should include a small department store, Spence Newland came to life. He’s a man whose sickly childhood prompts him to want to prove his ability to manage his wealthy family’s interests. Part of that proof comes in diversifying into five-and-ten-cent stores, but he needs an outside investor. That’s where the gift comes in.

Along with the story came the idea for the Widow’s Might series about a group of young widows mentored in life by an older widow. Now, I’m hard at work asking all the necessary questions as I write the first novel in the series.

So, you see, authors ask their own questions and keep asking until they get the answers they need to create a story readers adore.

Next question?

Sandra Ardoin

Unwrapping Hope

She chose the wrong man once. Can she trust her instincts now?

Phoebe Crain, an accomplished pianist, lives in near poverty to protect her five-year-old daughter from scandal. When Phoebe receives a handcrafted cigar box by mistake, her desperation to give the child something special for Christmas drives her to suggest a trade with Spence Newland, a man she views as no more principled than her daughter’s late father. But the more time she spends with the department store heir, the more Phoebe struggles to keep up her guard against him.

Spence believes the cigar box will help him gain a reclusive investor’s financial support for his proposed five-and-ten-cent stores, demonstrating his ability to manage the family fortunes. Yet he hesitates to bargain with a widow who mistrusts him for no apparent reason…until he meets a charming little girl at the train station who awaits the arrival of a prince.

Will a betrayal in Phoebe’s past and Spence’s unraveling plans derail their hope for happiness and keep a child’s fairy tale from coming true?

You’ll find Unwrapping Hope and and all my books on Amazon.

~ ~ ~

Lord, please bless each word Sandra writes for You.
~ For Jesus’ sake

14 thoughts on “Sandra Ardoin: Let’s Chat

  1. Perrianne Askew

    I love historical fiction and am mind boggled over all of the questions that you ask during the writing process. I enjoy the fact that you are doing your “homework” to make sure the time setting and everything is right. It’s intriguing that you took a different twist in choosing Alaska for a gold rush story. It would also be interesting to find out who got the wrong gift, so Unwrapping Hope sounds wonderful. I’m always afraid of someone getting the wrong gift!

     
     
    1. Hi Perrianne!

      Yes, so many questions are needed, but that’s what makes the brainstorming phase fun.

      I hope you’ll check out my books. At this moment, A Love Most Worthy (the Alaskan novella) is on sale, but it won’t last long. 🙂

       
       
  2. I love historical fiction as I taught fifth grade social studies for five years. I would have my students pretend to be characters from each era we studied. It was fascinating to see their perceptions of history. My preferred reading for pleasure is historical fiction especially involving early pioneers and their struggles. Your novels sound exactly like what I would like to read. I really appreciate reading about your process of writing. Each novel seems to stem from a single idea. I will check them out. Keep up the great writing.

     
     
    1. Thank you for your kind words, Jane, and social studies was one of my favorite classes in school. 🙂

       
       
    2. Thank you, Jane!

       
       
  3. Love all your books, Sandra!

    Yes! It’s so important for authors to ask questions too!

     
     
    1. Thank you, Dawn! I’m busy at work asking questions on the next book. 😉

       
       
    2. Welcome, Dawn! Seeing your name brought a smile to my face 🙂

       
       
  4. I enjoy reading Sandra’s stories. 🙂

     
     
    1. You’re so kind, Melissa. Thank you! 🙂

       
       
    2. Hi, Melissa. Great to see you in our midst. Thank you for encouraging Sandra. 🙂

       
       
  5. Hey, Alison! I love Christmas books, too, which is why I enjoy writing them. I hope you enjoy Unwrapping Hope!

     
     
  6. Alison Boss

    Thanks for the wonderful interview, Sandra & Linda! Historical Christian fiction is my favorite genre to read! All of your books sound wonderful, Sandra! Your newest book, Unwrapping Hope, really grabbed my attention. I love Christmas books, and this story sounds very intriguing!! I look forward to reading it and have added it to my TBR list. 🙂

     
     
    1. Great to welcome you to the circle, Alison. Thank you for contributing to the conversation with encouraging words.

       
       

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