Let’s Chat! Author Elaine Manders

Welcome, Everyone!

Elaine Manders delights readers with her historical romances. This week Elaine tells us about her latest release, Revealed, Book 3 in her Intrigue Under Western Skies series. Be sure to check out her giveaway offer below

**Congratulations to Cheryl Baranski, winner of Elaine’s giveaway this past week—a $10 Amazon gift card!** 

Revealed by Author Elaine Manders

Elaine MandersI wrote Revealed to answer an unresolved mystery from Books 1 and 2. What happened to Rhyan Cason’s mother? And to give Colt Holliman (Rhyan’s friend) a love interest. The spiritual themes are judgment and forgiveness.

As with most of my stories, unseen enemies, physical and spiritual, hound the protagonists, but they aren’t revealed until the end.

The Story Begins

Elaine MandersThe story opens in Charleston, South Carolina, where Katherine Levinson has led the idealistic life of a post-civil war Southern belle until her father dies unexpectedly.

Katherine and her gravely ill mother lose their home, and, behind her mother’s back, she contacts the brother she’s never met, Rhyan Cason, the famous cattle baron.

The Story Unfolds

Elaine MandersWhen they move to Nebraska and Rhyan’s sprawling ranch, Sollano, questions arise over Katherine’s legal status as an heiress to the Cason estate. Old sins are uncovered, turning the townfolk against Katherine and her mother.

Elaine MandersNo one understands Katherine’s resentment and confusion except Colt. His modest horse ranch, the Double Bar H, appeals to her more than Sollano’s opulence.

Love and Faith Bloom

Elaine MandersTheir attraction grows, and Colt finds himself spiritually conflicted. He has promised to wait for another woman to finish her contract with the Wild West Show to announce their engagement. Following his heart would require him to break that commitment, but a sense of honor holds him back. In time, he realizes withholding his true feelings is a form of dishonesty that leads to dire consequences.

I can’t go any further into Revealed or I might give the plot away. I will say, Colt and Katherine are drawn together and face an unexpected danger that tests their love and their faith in God, and a prairie fire is a part of that danger.

Insights From Elaine Manders

One of the greatest joys of writing a new book is discovering a new spiritual truth—something that jumps out at me unexpectedly. This is the lesson I found in Revealed. Katherine is explaining to her friend, Maggie, why she won’t judge others, even those misjudging her. “We don’t have the ability to judge others, Maggie. When we do, we’re playing God, and that’s a dangerous thing to do.”

Elaine MandersThat was a real eye-opener for me. Yes, I’d always known it was wrong to judge others, even though we have to consider their fruit, but I never asked, “why?” It’s obvious, isn’t it? We can’t see into a person’s heart. We don’t know their background—and more important—we don’t know God’s purpose for them. In other words, we can’t play God. And it is dangerous, because the Bible says we’ll be judged by the same measure we use to judge others.

A Giveaway from Elaine Manders

Join our conversation below, and you’ll be entered in Elaine’s drawing for a $10 Amazon gift card. We’re looking forward to your comments!

How to Find Elaine Manders

Amazon
Facebook
Twitter  @ehmanders
Website

Elaine Manders
Book 1: Intrigue Under Western Skies series by Elaine Manders
Book 2: Intrigue Under Western Skies series by Elaine Manders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Father God, You are the Creator, the Sustainer, and the only wise Judge. We confess we often attempt to act as judge in Your place. For this we ask Your forgiveness. We’re thankful for Elaine’s novel, Revealed, which entertains, enlightens, and convicts. Please bless every single word she writes for You. 
~ For Jesus’ sake

15 thoughts on “Let’s Chat! Author Elaine Manders

  1. Elaine Manders

    Thanks everyone for your comments. And thank you, Linda for sharing my thoughts and book. I really enjoyed it.

     
     
  2. Cheryl Baranski

    This is something that I need reminding of from time to time.

     
     
    1. So true for all of us, Cheryl. Thanks for joining our gathering. Please come back.

       
       
  3. Perrianne Askew

    It’s a good reminder to ourselves about judgement. It’s best that we not judge his creation…no matter where they stand and whatever their circumstances. If we thought about it that way maybe we would be more careful about judging….especially since we’re not mind readers either.

     
     
    1. Ditto, Perianne. Thanks so much for visiting with us.

       
       
  4. Lucy Reynolds

    I always say walk a mile in someone else’s shoes before you judge them as we have no idea what goes on behind closed doors.

     
     
    1. Amen, Lucy. (Walk a mile in their house slippers 🙂

       
       
  5. Love this quote. “One of the greatest joys of writing a new book is discovering a new spiritual truth—something that jumps out at me unexpectedly.”
    It’s an amazing moment!
    Great interview, ladies!

     
     
    1. Amen, Gail.

       
       
  6. Marilyn R

    Hello Linda and Elaine, I have read Elaine’s books and look forward to reading Revealed. Readers will enjoy the research she does prior to writing and the spiritual lessons that can be obtained. Blessings to you both for an amazing week. God bless.

     
     
    1. Thank you, Marilyn.

       
       
  7. Elaine Manders

    Thanks for hosting me, Linda. I love your blog posts.

     
     
    1. It’s my honor and privilege, Elaine.

       
       
  8. Faith Creech

    I agree. I always remember the Bible verses in James that tell us not to judge others. That is a hard one for me for I find myself judging others in my heart. I always have to confess that sin!
    Your books look very interesting! Thanks for a chance to win!

     
     
    1. Amen, Faith. I do too.

       
       

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Politics, Yesterday and Today

I can’t watch the news for long. Not when it’s about politics. Gets my dander up. My imagination wanders to places it has no business as a Christian—except to prayer. Politics, yesterday and today, can get most anyone’s dander up.

http-::www.loc.gov:pictures:resource:cph.3g12608:_Brooks_Preston 2
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/ resource/cph.3g12608/ (Public Domain)

Political elections, particularly presidential, are a grim reality of the present, as they were in the past. So are congressional disagreements and political infighting. But as heated as speeches, interviews, and press conferences can become today, we have yet to witness what South Carolinian, U.S. Representative Preston S. Brooks, one of my distant cousins, perpetrated on Senator Charles Sumner in the U.S. Congress on May 22, 1856. 

Sacking-lawrence_public-domain
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Sacking_of_Lawrence#/media/ File:Sacking-lawrence.jpg (Public Domain)

Per an account of the event at www.ushistory.org, Republican Senator Sumner of Massachusetts, an avowed Abolitionist, gave a bitter speech in the Senate after the sack of Lawrence, Kansas on May 21, 1856 in which he blasted the “murderous robbers from Missouri,” calling them “hirelings, picked from the drunken spew and vomit of an uneasy civilization.” Part of his speech was a bitter, personal tirade against South Carolina’s Senator Andrew Butler whom Sumner declared  an imbecile. “Senator Butler has chosen a mistress. I mean the harlot, slavery.” Stephen Douglas predicted that a fool like Sumner would likely get himself killed by another fool. The speech went on for two days and another two days passed before the prediction proved true.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Caning_of_Charles_Sumner#/ media/File:Southern_Chivalry.jpg (Public Domain)
https-::en.wikipedia.org:wiki:Charles_Sumner_Walking_cane_used_to_assault_Senator_Charles_Summner,_May_1856_-_Old_State_House_Museum,_Boston,_MA_-_IMG_6685
https-::en.wikipedia.org:wiki: Charles_Sumner_Walking_cane_ used_to_assault_Senator_Charles_ Summner,_May_1856_-_Old_State_ House_Museum,_Boston,_MA_-_ IMG_6685 (Public Domain)

Representative Preston Brooks of South Carolina was a Southerner raised to live by an unwritten code of honor. Defending the reputation of one’s family was at the top of the list. As a distant cousin of Senator Butler, Brooks entered the Senate chamber where Sumner was working at his desk. “You’ve libeled my state and slandered my white-haired old relative, Senator Butler, and I’ve come to punish you for it.” Brooks struck Sumner over the head repeatedly with a gold-tipped cane. The cane shattered as Brooks administered blow after blow on Sumner, but Brooks could not be stopped. Only after being physically restrained did Brooks end the pummeling.

Northerners were incensed. The House levied Brooks a $300 fine for the assault when they were unable to garner the votes to expel him. He resigned and returned home where South Carolina held events in his honor and reelected him to his House seat. Replacement canes were sent to Brooks from all over the south. This response outraged northern moderates even more than the caning itself. (Shades of politics today?)

http-::www.ushistory.org:us:31e.asp
http-::www.ushistory.org:us:31e.asp

The physical and psychological injuries from the caning kept Charles Sumner away from the Senate for most of the next several years. The voters of Massachusetts reelected him and let his seat sit vacant during his absence as a reminder of southern brutality. The violence from Kansas had spilled over into politics in the national legislature.

Which brings me back to politics today. Sure enough, what’s old is new. We’ve seen via news and online clips the brawls that have erupted in legislative bodies in countries around the world. And outside peaceful political gatherings in the U.S. We’ve seen the extremes to which political and religious fanaticism has taken some. And we’ve turned off our TVs to find peace amid the turmoil. But so far we haven’t seen a physical attack in the U.S. Congress since the one perpetrated by one of my very distant Brooks relatives. 

Lord, deliver us from such. (And keep the canes out of Congress!)

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